Tag Archives: Four Directions

Creativity

Facing South, I call the element fire into the circle, asking for inspiration and creative strength. I turn towards the youth movement engaging in a way forward, into a better, more creative and resilient future based on values and collaborative social structures. I open myself for renewal, new promising visions and ideas.

Have you ever asked yourself what the inside of a seed might look like? Have you ever planted a seed in a bit of soil, given it water and sunlight? Have you seen what grows out of it? A sprout, a couple of leaves on a tiny little stem. Have you ever wondered how a seed of such small size can bring forth a tree, stingily rooted in the earth, reaching up to the sky, giving shade, fruit, life for hundreds of years to come? I’m amazed It seems like something that goes beyond; there is an inherit order of things that is larger than me, bigger than me.

Creativity is the nature of the universe. Everything works, everything constantly creates and deconstructs to create again. Can I even grasp it? How can I bring my creative power into being, into true existence, join the forces of nature and be an instrument for peace in this world?

When I sit in meditation, practicing mindfulness in the moment I am practicing peace within myself. When I practice walking on the earth I become aware that I am a part; a part of the whole, of the process of becoming. I make the whole complete. When I walk into empty spaces can I fill the void? Can I bring that creative presence, be that missing piece that makes the space complete? The landscape, the trees and me. The picture forms as I walk. Does it exist without me?

I am letting go of the idea that I need to be and I become. My intention is peace; peace is the seed that I sow; it will grow as I paint the landscape within; I paint the landscape without.

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Mindfulness

Facing East, I’m calling the element Air into the circle, asking for the power of the sun, sharp precision and focus in my undertakings. I find peace through clarity, the innocence of the infant as the wind blows through the deepest valleys of my being. May purity and truth guide our inspiration and intuition in every moment, in every step.  

It is a miracle to walk on water. The Vietnamese Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh says that the real miracle is to walk on the earth. We all can do that, can’t we? But have we ever actually been present walking on the earth? How do the feet feel on the ground, the wind on our skin? Have we ever been aware of that… and appreciated it? Are we aware of the sensations that a smile brings to our bodies? Have we ever fully listened to one of our fellow human beings, our friends, our children? Have we ever eaten a tangerine?

Adding a handful of loving kindness and compassion to awareness gives us mindfulness – the Buddhist dharma of being lovingly present in every moment and in whatever we do. Visiting Buddhist temples inThailandandCambodiawe often encountered stair steps that are leading to the Buddha statues double or triple as high as the ones in a normal house. Why? I asked. It is not an easy walk to reach the highest, the Buddha, I was told – it is a walk done in full awareness and participation. Every step is a step in mindfulness as we climb the steps of realisation. Every step is of equal importance, is the next possible step, the present moment, … every step is peace.

Only in realising the universality, the interconnectedness of every step in life, only when we put our feet in front of each other in full awareness, in full participation, we’ve actually done a step.

In this way mindfulness is not an idea that is practiced in meditation alone – mindfulness is the tool that lets us be, that makes us live in every moment, that connects us to our surroundings, the world and the people. We can practice mindfulness in every moment: when we breathe, breathing in, I know I’m breathing in, breathing out, I know I’m breathing out; breathing in, I’m here in the present moment, breathing out, this is a wonderful moment. It is the breath that in a subtle way connects us to the outside world, from the moment we’re born until the moment our body passes away. We can practice mindfulness while walking: I’m breathing in and I’m breathing out, I have arrived and I am home, in the here and in the now, I’m breathing in and I’m breathing out.

When the Buddha explained the idea of mindfulness to a group of kids, he gave them a tangerine and made them feel it with their hands while peeling it, feeling the sensations on their tongues while eating it, every sensation in the mouth and through the body. How does it feel to eat a tangerine in full presence and participation?

Another way to practice mindfulness in the modern world is through listening – what Thich Nhat Hanh calls deep listening. Deep listening is practiced by his followers and others all around the world. In our modern world of distraction and individualism can we really deeply listen to each other? Are we able to hear what another person is telling us without building our personal opinion in our heads, already thinking of what we’ll say next? Can we hear what our friend says, can we hear what our bodies say, what the earth says with every movement she makes? To listen is to understand. Can we breathe in understanding, walk in understanding, be in understanding? Can we walk the earth in peace, reconciling with every step we make? Can we be in loving awareness, in full participation, in mindfulness?

Observation

Facing North, I’m calling the element Earth into the circle, asking for groundedness in the forces of nature, the foundation of our being. I’m thankful for the wisdom of the elders incorporated in everything around us and am asking for its revelation to us. May abundance and growth, understanding and expression be with us on our paths.

Finding a few minutes every day to silently observe the surroundings creates new strings of connection with elements, energies, plants and animals. You start building new reletionships that open up new worlds.

Choosing the same place to observe nature everyday, by nature awareness practitioners and teachers called sit-spot, allows you to observe a space over time, through seasons and to become familiar with it. As you become familiar with your spot, the spot becomes familiar with you as well and will accept you. Animals start appearing more frequently as they see you as a peaceful part of the space; every here and there details appear in the patterns and patterns in the detail; energy flows, systems, guilds, connections, relationships, sequences, all will slowely reveal themselves to you.

You can play observation games in changing your perspective every other day. Looking through the eyes of a child and asking yourself with curiosity the most simple questions: Why is this plant climbing up the tree? Does it hort the tree?How come that the ground vegetation is more on the edge of the forest than inside? I wonder how those patterns got on that rock and why the river never runs empty? Where is it coming from and where is it going? You might chose to be an electric engeneer and observe the energy flows within the system: What makes plants grow? Where do they go when they die? Why? Where is the sunlight blocked and what effect does it have? What creates the flow of the river, the hum of the bee? There are many questions – asking questions is part of the observation while the answers will reveal themselves after time. You can observe detail, patterns, light, relationships, edges; you can use eyes, ears, nose, or touch; you can be a scientist, a turtle, a rock, a painter or a tree; doing these exercises will increase your awareness and sharing your experiences with others will open up new ways of seeing and understanding.

In some old earth based traditions people have a much deeper connection and communication with their environment. When they observe, they dive into, become one with; they realise the earth as their larger body and as an integral part of themselves. As we build up new relationships we become part of something bigger.